First World Problems

After forgetting to switch her geyser on one day, Lili Radloff feels empathy for the great unwashed.

Radloff

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8 comments

  1. So the real challenge is that we need to get working geysers for everyone?

  2. anastasya · · Reply

    So a geiser breaks? In your comfortable home? And you can pull out a credit card and get it fixed? No, this is NOTHING like those images of real destitute people you posted. They wish they had a geyser, even broken. Or a home it was in. Or money to afford food, let alone comforts of your life.

    I find this post insulting. It takes me back to a show I watched where the film maker and his girlfriend live on minimum wage for a month so they know ”how the poor fee”. BULLSHIT. For you it’s a game, a ride. Afterwards you get to go back to your nice life. Worst part about poverty is it doesn’t end. You don’t get out.

    If we can’t understand what it’s like, perhaps we can try respect it?

    Just a thought.

  3. There is serious mis alignment between what we think we’re doing with 67 minutes of charity work once a year and how people are actually living.

    We need 67 minutes per person per week. Without media. Without mutual back patting etc. That could have impact. Maybe.

  4. Anastasya. I didn’t post the picture. I simply tweeted that being cold, hungry and tired is what millions of SAns feel like every day and that we should do more. The creator of this blog added the picture for effect.

  5. Phehello · · Reply

    Lilly, Lilly … Where to start … Living in a shack – not for one night (summer or winter), all your life! Can you do that? Walking 10km to school on a seriously worn-out pair of shoes? Sharing R10 over 4 children? 67 minutes is nothing … Can anyone do that for 67minutes? Andrew is correct – we need 67 minutes from every middle class person every day – without the back-patting and media … Watering a food garden at a township school by a CEO is nothing! Painting a wall at a local school is nothing … We need far more … There are too many examples – some of us have been there! Some of my relatives still live there. This is a reality to many of us, not a social experiment to be experienced for an hour! It is the story of our lives!

    But then I guess we cannot stop anyone from running their own experiments at the expense of others …

    This is the new SA that our beloved father who art in Houghton fought for!

  6. Lili at least you thought about the rest of the people who have less than what you have, most can’t even spare a thought. and I’m glad you feel an hour once a year is not enough because it isn’t. in fact in my opinion its useless . with that being said i truly feel that this day should be changed to ‘a day of opportunities. opportunities to make life better. I come from a poor background I stayed in a shack for many many years. all the food and money handouts i got temporarily solved my problems until a few individuals gave me an opportunity to learn skills and earn my own money. today i live a fairly affordable life because of the opportunity i got a decade ago. now imagine people with power giving some similar opportunities to people who are struggling to put food on the table on this day.not money. not food..an opportunity….the possibilities are endless ….{happy belated birth day Tata, i forgot it was your birthday yesterday}

  7. Lili Radloff · · Reply

    Phehello, this was not an experiment on my part to try and feel the horror that the majority of this country’s citizens experience daily. I could never even imagine that, no matter how hard I tried, because I was born into privilege. Yesterday I just had a bad day, and started to feel sorry for myself. Then I started counting my blessings and expressed my horror at other people’s misery, saying that what we’re doing is not enough. I am not sure why my statement was seen as offensive. I do think that the pictures (added to my tweet and not by me) with the “unwashed masses” tag makes it rather offensive, but that wasn’t done by me.

  8. 67 minutes is an elastoplast on the wound of our guilty collective conscience

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